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Education chiefs back campaign for school kids to sing One Britain One Nation anthem

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The government has backed a campaign calling on school children to celebrate One Britain One Nation Day this week by singing a patriotic song.

In a post on social media, the Department for Education said it was “encouraging schools across the UK to celebrate One Britain One Nation Day on 25 June, when children can learn about our shared values of tolerance, kindness, pride and respect’.

The song, written by school children from Bradford, includes the lyrics: “We are Britain and we have one dream – to unite all people in one great team.”

Another line says the country is “united forever, never apart”.

It ends by repeating “Strong Britain, Great Nation” four times.

An official music video has also been created for the song.

School children are also encouraged to clap for one minute on Friday to recognise those people who helped during the pandemic.

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The One Britain One Nation (OBON) campaign says on its webpage that its vision is “to create a strong, fair, harmonious and a proud British Nation – celebrating patriotism and respect for all our people”.

The campaign, launched by former policeman Kash Singh, adds that it hopes to “instil a sense of pride and self-esteem in our youth”.

Encouraging schools to join in the OBON celebrations, the website states: “We need the support of your school to celebrate the day in the spirit it is intended and as outlined in the OBON DAY 2021 brochure but to do the following as a MUST please.

“At 10am on Friday 25th June 2021 encourage every child in your school to clap for a minute to recognise, embrace and pay tribute to all those people who helped during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis.

“Sing the OBON DAY 2021 anthem written by school children at St John’s CE Primary School, Bradford.”

It is unclear how many schools have signed up to the event.

Those backing the campaign include actress Joanna Lumley, Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis and Conservative peer Norman Tebbit.

But not everyone has endorsed the idea, with one social media user tweeting a picture of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un under the Department for Education’s tweet and calling the move “embarrassing”.

Others were quick to point out that 25 June marks the beginning of the school holidays for many pupils in Scotland and therefore they would not be able to take part in the event.

“Does one nation mean England only?” one added.

Meanwhile, education is a devolved matter in Wales and it is not believed the country’s officials were involved in the process.