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The 20 Nottingham buildings or areas which are ‘at risk’, according to heritage report

today3 July 2022

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Some 20 buildings or areas of historic importance in Nottingham are at risk, according to conservationists. Historic England releases a list every year of features which are, or are believed, to be in danger of serious, potentially irreversible decline.

This could be because they have already fallen into disrepair or are thought to be likely to do so imminently due to neglect. There are six historic city structures and 14 conservation areas on the most recent register.

This is how Historic England assesses the condition of the city sites. The descriptions include ratings which reflect the degree of concern, from A – the most serious – to F. The condition of the building or structure is rated as very bad, poor, fair or optimal.

Read more: Haunting images show deserted Hyson Green flats that were demolished after just 20 years

Church of St Mary, High Pavement

The grand Church of St Mary, on High Pavement in the Lace Market, is listed as at risk by Historic England. The grand church is mostly 15th century but was later restored in the 19th century by George Gilbert Scott.

There are several areas requiring urgent masonry repair, according to Historic England. In addition, several roofs are said to require repair and the rainwater disposal system needs attention to prevent water ingress and decay.



St Mary's Church in The Lace Market, Nottingham.
St Mary’s Church in The Lace Market, Nottingham.

A Grant for Places of Worship was awarded in 2014 by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, enabling the nave roof covering to be repaired. The Parochial Church Council are keen to effect repairs with grant support from Historic England’s Covid Emergency Heritage at Risk Response Fund.

Condition: Poor; Priority: C – Slow decay; no solution agreed. Previous Priority: C.

Capitol Bingo and Social Club, Churchfield Lane

The building in Radford was previously a cinema in 1936-37 by Reginald Cooper and is now a Zionist Church. The structure is built of red brick and reconstituted stone construction, with the auditorium retaining most of its original features.

Historic England say the roof is in poor condition and needs recovering and that rainwater dispersal also needs to be addressed. Some emergency repairs to stabilise the building’s condition were completed with an Historic England Repair Grant but water continues to penetrate the interior and is causing damage to the remarkable fibrous plasterwork.



Capitol Bingo and Social Club, Churchfield Lane
Capitol Bingo and Social Club, Churchfield Lane

The building owners are keen to effect further urgent repairs and are in discussion with the National Lottery Heritage Fund. Condition: Poor Priority: A – Immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric; no solution agreed Previous Priority: A.

Church of St Peter, St Peter’s Gate

The Church of St Peter sits right at heart of the city of Nottingham, but also has been listed as at risk. The church was started in the 12 century, with it being completed in the 15 century.

More additions were made in the 19th and 20th centuries. A National Lottery Heritage Fund award enabled the nave and south aisle roofs to be recovered in 2020, but the north aisle slated roof leaks and also requires urgent repair.



St Peter's Church in St Peter's Gate, Nottingham.
St Peter’s Church in St Peter’s Gate, Nottingham.

The chancel slate roof is suffering from nail fatigue. The Parochial Church Council of the building are said to be keen to explore potential funding avenues for repair programmes.

Condition: Poor Priority: C – Slow decay; no solution agreed. Previous Priority: D.

County House, High Pavement

The townhouse on High Pavement is thought to have been built in the 15th or 16th century. It was rebuilt between 1728 and 1733, remodelled and extended in 1833 to form judges’ lodgings, and then converted to offices in 1922, and further extended in 1930 and 1949.

The building is in a very bad condition, according to Historic England. The beam in the north west wing has failed and there is defective plasterwork throughout. One of the staircases has failed.



County House in High Pavement
County House in High Pavement

Listed Building consent for a new use has been granted, but the building is currently unoccupied. The owner is working with Nottingham City Council on future plans.

Condition: Very bad; Occupancy / Use: Vacant/not in use; Priority: B – Immediate risk of further rapid deterioration or loss of fabric; solution agreed but not yet implemented; Previous Priority: B.

Church of St Peter, Hartley Road

The Church of St Peter on Hartley Road in Radford was built in 1812 by Henry Moses Wood in the Early English and Decorated styles. The present building replaced an earlier building, of which little survives.

The roof coverings generally are in poor condition and water ingress has caused damage to the interior decoration. Broken and leaking rainwater goods have saturated the stonework.



Church of St Peter, Hartley Road, Radford
Church of St Peter, Hartley Road, Radford

According to Historic England, the church has been the subject of antisocial behaviour. Grant funding is being sought to pay for the needed repairs.

Condition: Poor; Priority: C – Slow decay; no solution agreed. Previous: Priority: C.

Church of St Augustine, Apostle of England, Woodborough Road

The Church of St Augustine in St Ann’s was built in 1921 by John Sidney Brocklesby, with an accomplished architectural design and interior fixtures and “fittings of significant quality”, with Historic England highlighting the 1740 organ, stained glass and rood screen. However pitched roofs above the domes and the tower were never built.



Church of St Augustine on Woodborough Road
Church of St Augustine on Woodborough Road

Roof coverings have been problematic and internal plasterwork containing asbestos had fallen on several occasions. Asbestos was removed in 2016 and the asphalt covered domes and flat roof were treated with a resin-based waterproofing system in 2021. The concrete domes remain unrepaired.

Condition: Poor; Priority: C – Slow decay; no solution agreed. Previous: Priority: C.

14 Conservation areas are listed in the at risk category by Historic England. The condition of these sites are listed below.

  • Alfreton Road/Gamble Street – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Medium Trend: Improving

  • Nottingham Canal – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Improving significantly

  • Old Market Square – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Medium Trend: Improving significantly

  • Old Sneinton – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Improving

  • Sneinton Market – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Improving significantly

  • Star Buildings – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Deteriorating

  • The Arboretum – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: No significant change

  • The Lace Market – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Medium Trend: Improving

  • The Station – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Improving significantly

  • Canning Circus – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Deteriorating

  • Hine Hall – Condition: Poor; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Deteriorating

  • Mapperley Hospital – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Improving

  • New Lenton – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Deteriorating

  • Bulwell – Condition: Very bad; Vulnerability: Low Trend: Improving

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